[syndicated profile] phd_comics_feed
Piled Higher & Deeper by Jorge Cham
www.phdcomics.com
Click on the title below to read the comic
title: "Your Social Parabola" - originally published 9/20/2017

For the latest news in PHD Comics, CLICK HERE!

quick meme

Sep. 20th, 2017 03:07 pm
thistleingrey: (Default)
[personal profile] thistleingrey
from Facebook, albeit via a DW friend, because I'm sick:

Read more... )
naraht: (Default)
[personal profile] naraht
nothing gold can stay (2628 words) by Naraht
Chapters: 1/?
Fandom: Yuri!!! on Ice (Anime)
Rating: Teen And Up Audiences
Warnings: No Archive Warnings Apply
Relationships: Yuri Plisetsky & Victor Nikiforov, Yuri Plisetsky & Yakov Feltsman, Lilia Baranovskaya/Yakov Feltsman
Characters: Yuri Plisetsky, Victor Nikiforov, Yakov Feltsman, Lilia Baranovskaya
Additional Tags: Rivals, Post-Canon, Growing Up, Coming of Age, growth spurt, Injury, 2018 Winter Olympics, Aging
Summary: Yuri Plisetsky will never step out of Victor's shadow. Not if Victor has anything to do with it.

Or, the epic Nikiforov/Plisetsky rivalry in the run-up to the 2018 Games.



Here it is, the long one. The first chapter of the long one, at least.

A friend tells me that 'rage-filled teenage boy athlete' is not my usual aesthetic – probably an understatement! But it's a refreshing change in writing terms, and it's good to stretch yourself... right?

US politics

Sep. 20th, 2017 09:33 am
cesy: "Cesy" - An old-fashioned quill and ink (Default)
[personal profile] cesy
Hope not Hate is coming to the US, to counter the rise of international hate groups. American friends, you can sign up here.

river ganseys

Sep. 19th, 2017 09:34 pm
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[personal profile] thistleingrey
Penelope Lister Hemingway, River Ganseys: Strikin' t'loop, Swaving, and Other Yorkshire Knitting Curiosities Revived from the Archives (2015): the thesis that winds through it is that ganseys (a set of ways for making pullovers) are an emanation of the Industrial Age, late C18 into the English Regency. It needed better editing than its tiny indie press could offer. Half is heavily personalized historical overview---whenever we meet her ancestors in the historical record, she points it out even if there's no family account to add to what records indicate; half is howto.

On p. 70, near the end of a chapter on nineteenth-century knitting in Yorkshire schools, prisons, and homes, Hemingway implies that being taught to knit in school according to a curriculum is what led to holding the needles "British" style (I've always heard "English" and have no idea how Welsh, Scottish, Cornish, or indeed Manx knitters may have tended to position their hands). At home, she says, they'd probably continued the older manner of "holding needles under fists" and throwing the yarn "continental" style. Interesting, though because there aren't enough trappings of scholarly approach, I have no idea whether Hemingway was able/interested in scholarly due diligence....

She suggests that the cables aren't mirrored in ganseys because of an old fear of mirrored reflection; she describes green as the forbidden color on account of "creation/god" (p. 92), though I know it as fairy-color from medieval texts. (Or any number of other things, including Buchan's Witch Wood.) In any case, vanishingly few bird motifs on ganseys, either.

ObContemporaryRetake: Seascale and Ardmore fall into one basket; Rocquaine and Guernsey make another.

fiber monday

Sep. 17th, 2017 08:59 pm
thistleingrey: (Default)
[personal profile] thistleingrey
___Sand is shelved until my mother's cardigan has been finished. Having put myself more or less on deadline for my mother's cardigan and the pi shawl (how is the weather fall-like already?), I found the next day that I needed something more portable than a cardigan and less fussy than the pi shawl. (I worry that carrying the shawl around would fuzz up its yarn.) For back-to-school night I've cast on my sage/off-white Herbarium, and its one small ear will sit in a bag until the next time I need something easy. For back-to-school night I've also written a sentence about something I did in first grade (visit the local library once a week, every week) and drawn a quick picture to accompany it: minus ten potential knitting minutes. :P

(Who knows whether she'll even wear her cardigan---she hasn't worn the poncho that she requested and I knitted two years ago---but this pattern is loose enough to fit me, too, though the sleeves would be short. We currently wear the same storebought shirt size but with different proportions at each point. Anyway, Reason wants like burning to inherit this cardigan despite being too small for it now, and I've been bidden not to rip it back.)

I've realized that for the paired indigo-cochineal shawls, the two colorways are too similar to make the bicolor mosaic motif "pop" properly. There's a US source that sells both Hespa---though not in the colorways my mother has bought---and conventionally dyed Ístex. I've made my best guess at one skein for just the mosaic rows; the stripes that frame them can use the gifted yarn and be a bit patchy. My stash included a bit of Ístex einband already, so it was clear upon meeting the Hespa skeins that they use the same yarn base.

some things

Sep. 17th, 2017 03:26 pm
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[personal profile] thistleingrey
* I may not have finished watching Damo, but parts of its soundtrack (and the Tearliner contributions to Coffee Prince's OST, esp. "Go Go Chan") have been great for lulling an overextended child to sleep. In infancy, the title track in its oboe-solo iteration; now, as long as I don't use it often, the semi-power ballad "Bi ga." heh. If the fingers slip in choosing a track, just catch "Fate" before it gets going---not so restful.

* A week after Irma had passed him, my father declared that all was well except for how much the media had lied to everyone to let supermarkets drive prices up for water and supplies. I informed him that he was lucky and changed the subject. His electrical power is still out, but somehow that has nothing to do with whether the radio's weather announcer lied.

#notalloctogenarians but they sure sound like five-year-olds sometimes. No doubt the contrast would be less inviting if I weren't able to compare numerous six- and seven-year-olds of my acquaintance favorably to my father, eh? I'm aware that sometimes people just never "grow up." He did; I remember. It's a blessing that he doesn't remember what he's lost and losing---that would be harder all around.

Meanwhile, the same phone chat made it clear that he's become able to sympathize with his incomplete picture of my health issues/concerns because partner has talked with him about them. Doesn't matter what I say. But I understand a bit better now how he failed to comprehend my mother's illness with Bell's palsy for two years, longer than most people suffer it, since she had no rest or help. Then they divorced, which should've happened sooner, and her life improved. That part is years and years ago, during my early twenties.
Crawl back under your rock of self-estrangement

* It is difficult to use the internet to research specific remedies and palliative measures (for me) without swimming forever amidst groundless hearsay. Bring back 1997. (Not really.)

09/15/17 PHD comic: 'Inner Gollum'

Sep. 17th, 2017 12:25 pm
[syndicated profile] phd_comics_feed
Piled Higher & Deeper by Jorge Cham
www.phdcomics.com
Click on the title below to read the comic
title: "Inner Gollum" - originally published 9/15/2017

For the latest news in PHD Comics, CLICK HERE!

highlyeccentric: A woman in an A-line dress, balancing a book on her head, in front of bookshelves (Make reading sexy)
[personal profile] highlyeccentric
Currently Reading: Alex Beecroft, 'Blue Eyed Stranger'; Griffith Review 36; misc other... stuff

Recently Finished:

Interpreter of MaladiesInterpreter of Maladies by Jhumpa Lahiri

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


This was an *interesting*, if unsettling, book. Some of the stories keep coming back in fragments in my mind: the perspective choice in When Mr Pirzada Came To Dine, to recount the Bangladeshi-Pakistani conflict through the incomplete perceptions of a child, was a particularly arresting one. The Treatment of Bibi Haldar left me with anger I was unable to properly defuse for some time - the girl with her under-treated illness, the it suddenly became clear she was being sexually abused, without the story ever specifying that because none of the characters even seemed to *think* of it. The titular story made me quite uncomfortable, but was intricately composed.

I think my favourite was the last, 'The third and final continent' - its characterisation of the boarding-house owner in particular moved me, for whatever reason.

Courting the CountessCourting the Countess by Jenny Frame

My rating: 2 of 5 stars


Mmm, I just don't know how I feel about this one. It was compelling, and it was a nice change to see this rough plot arc played out with women (I see it a lot in m/m romance: career focused commitmentphobe meets some nice chappy who insists on commitment in red letters, angst ensues and we end with matrimony-like arrangements). But I found myself irked by the emphasis on Annie's lack of experience, and by just HOW heavily the 'the right woman will cure all your emotional traumas and then you marry' notes fell.

I found myself shipping the two supporting characters, Bridget the Vicar and Quin the Farmer, much more strongly than the main pairing. Apparently there's a sequel about Bridget the Vicar but it's not matching her with Quin the Farmer, so. I may or may not.

Spindle's EndSpindle's End by Robin McKinley

My rating: 4 of 5 stars


This was a delightful fairy tale, but like... inexplicable heterosexuality? I mean. The two girls were running around BREATHING THE SAME BREATH and there was TRUE LOVE'S KISS and everything. Narl was sweet, but note Our Heroine only fell in love with him when she suddenly thought he was in love with her best friend? And when her best friend suddenly and obviously fell in love with another dude?

Look Both Ways: Bisexual PoliticsLook Both Ways: Bisexual Politics by Jennifer Baumgardner

My rating: 3 of 5 stars


This was a frustrating book. I learned a lot of interesting trivia about 90s pop culture, including that there were far more bisexuals in it than I thought. There were some occasionally well-phrased ways of expressing ideas I've seen before, but nothing particularly ground-breaking. Even taking into account that it's over a decade old, 'Closer to Home' is much older and MUCH more insightful.

This was... magazine-y. I've never read Ms magazine, for which the author used to write, but in Australian terms it felt like... Cleo: The Bisexual Special. Only with a weirdly uncritical Thing for second-wave feminist foremothers, without any of their depth. (One of the well-phrased ideas was that second wave feminist criticism did not actually equip the young women of the 90s to fully reshape or realise their relationships with men, but even that point turned into weird bitterness without offering an alternative. I wanted to smack the author upside the head and say READ MORE BELL HOOKS.)

For something subtitled 'bisexual politics' it's actually about 'bisexual female existence in a particular culture bubble', with limited political ANYTHING.


Also finished, to review later: Madhur Jaffrey's 'Vegetarian India'; Carolyn Larrington 'Brothers and Sisters in Medieval European Literature'; Aviolot 'The Course of Honour'; Alex Beecroft 'Trowchester Blues'; Catherynne M Valente, 'The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland In A Ship Of Her Own Making'.




Music notes: Saw Back N Black, the Swiss all-girl AC/DC cover band I saw back in 2014. They seem to be going through Drama, and were filling out the ranks with dudes on second guitar, bass and drums, but it was still a pretty good show. I got showered in fake blood courtesy of BB, the lead guitarist. This was unfortunate for my new cream t-shirt, but I think I've go the stains out now.

In celebration I bought myself 'Let There Be Rock'. I actually only owned one accadacca album and a couple of stray MP3s, until now. Clearly an oversight.

Where the Wide Aisles Are

Sep. 17th, 2017 08:16 am
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[personal profile] steepholm
My daughter has been working at Sainsbury's for a week now, but yesterday was the first day I'd actually seen her in her Sainsbury's jacket and name badge, when she popped home for some things before heading out again into the night.

It did make me wonder, though, whether she would ever be able to go into a supermarket while so attired. If she went into different store, say the Co-op, I imagine she would be driven out by staff enraged by her livery, much as crows will mob a sparrow-hawk. But if she went into a different Sainsbury's the following exchange would have a certain comic inevitability:

C [to the cashier]: Just this chewing gum, please.
Cashier: That'll be 45p.
Manager [interrupting]: You! Get to Till 13 right away! Don't you know we're understaffed today?
C: Me? But I'm only buying some chew--
Manager [hands already bunching into fists]: Don't answer back! Till 13 - hop to it!
C: But I don't even work here.... [Is bustled away to Till 13 and spends the next 7 hours weighing carrots.]


I don't know why I imagine all managers as ex-RSMs, but I do.

Sunday Secrets

Sep. 16th, 2017 11:19 pm
[syndicated profile] post_secret_feed

Posted by Frank


On 9/11/17, 3:59 AM, “Frank Warren” <frank@postsecret.com>
Dear Frank,
Yesterday I went to Barnes and Noble to get a book on infertility (my husband and I have been trying to conceive for almost a year and have reached the point of needing medical appointments). I picked up a PostSecret book while there and clinging to that book is the only thing that kept me from crying while I had to look through the pregnancy and baby type books to find a book to help my hurting heart. I didn’t find what I was looking for but I bought the postsecret book and wanted you to know that it brought me comfort.

Classic Secrets

Sep. 16th, 2017 10:56 pm
[syndicated profile] post_secret_feed

Posted by Frank



Information on Upcoming PostSecret Exhibition at the Museum of Man
(Volunteer or Leave Your Email for Updates)

 


RSVP and Details for PostSecret Live! in Oslo at Urban Peace Week
(Free and Open to All, September 21st)

Yuletide nominations and stuff

Sep. 14th, 2017 08:54 pm
naraht: (other-Yuletide squee)
[personal profile] naraht
How can the Yuletide season be starting already? Usually I'm on top of these things but this year I was caught without even a potential nominations list.

So, in a fit of absence of mind, I have nominated:

Return to Night - Mary Renault
Hilary Mansell
Julian Fleming
Lisa Clare
Elaine Fleming

Figure Skating RPF
Evgeni Plushenko
Stéphane Lambiel
Johnny Weir
Evan Lysacek [not so attached to him, does anyone have someone they'd like me to nominate instead?]

Cycling Commentator RPF
David Millar
Ned Boulting
Carlton Kirby
Sean Kelly [ditto... does anyone want Gary Imlach or Matt Stephens or Brian Smith?]

I'll be in North Wales for work tomorrow (!) and staying into Saturday for a mini-break, so I thought it was best to get things tided away now, lest I forget.

loneliness be over, when will this

Sep. 13th, 2017 08:45 pm
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[personal profile] thistleingrey
Ha Jin, A Map of Betrayal (2014): it was on the virtual endcap; the OverDrive landing page for one of my near-enough library systems featured it. Um. The novel opens with a fifty-something professor who uses a Fulbright term in China to investigate and reconstruct her dead spy father's first marriage. The narrative splits most chapters in two---first father, then daughter---though the whole thing struggles to avoid protracted didacticism. On one hand, it's a great opportunity for historical analysis as well as a good puzzle: how do you write a fictional secret history of a topic about which most readers know less than nothing?

On another hand, I agree with this stranger, who seems to have a stronger basis than I for similar views: the whole undertaking in which Lilian uncovers her father's past by talking with random Chinese people to whom she is introduced hopscotch-wise is a crock. Read more... )

Unlike the linked reviewer, I like father Gary's unsympathetic nature, one of the few things that gels for me here. War and spying are hard. Books need antiheroes sometimes.

09/13/17 PHD comic: 'Impostor Attack'

Sep. 13th, 2017 07:41 pm
[syndicated profile] phd_comics_feed
Piled Higher & Deeper by Jorge Cham
www.phdcomics.com
Click on the title below to read the comic
title: "Impostor Attack" - originally published 9/13/2017

For the latest news in PHD Comics, CLICK HERE!

music: 10 of the best

Sep. 13th, 2017 09:14 pm
forthwritten: white cassette tape lying on tangled magnetic tape (tape)
[personal profile] forthwritten
I've been really enjoying 10 of the best recently. With some bands, the appeal is in being reunited with songs dear as friends - revisiting them can be an experience in itself. With other bands that I know less well, it's learning of new-to-me songs, or seeing the music I know contextualised in a different way. With other bands, especially ones that I have listened to but lost track of, it's becoming aware of more recent work (especially when that work isn't easily accessed c.f. Burial's various EPs and collaborations). These are some of the lists I've particularly enjoyed or want to listen to later.

Genre
Northern Soul
Riot grrrl
Bollywood samples

Bands
Belle and Sebastian
Björk
Brian Eno
Burial
Cocteau Twins
David Bowie
Girls Aloud
Grace Jones
Joy Division
Leonard Cohen
Manic Street Preachers
Missy Elliott
Mogwai
Nick Cave
Pixies
PJ Harvey
Siouxsie and the Banshees
Slayer
Slipknot
St Vincent
Suede
Tori Amos

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